Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Discuss Niagara Sports

Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby Eagle » Thu May 07, 2020 8:47 pm

America, The Jesuit Review

"While Father Holtschneider described the benefits enumerated in the CARES Act as “promising,” he said that very few Catholic colleges were initially eligible for Small Business Administration loans because of a requirement that student workers be counted as employees. Only companies with 500 or fewer employees qualify for the loans, and since many Catholic college students work on campus to pay for tuition, those schools are not considered small businesses.

But beginning on May 6, the S.B.A. will no longer count students receiving federal work-study funds toward the 500-employee limit. That may open up a new source of support for some colleges, according to Father Holtschneider.


Catholic colleges and universities fight to avert fiscal disaster amid the coronavirus pandemic
Ryan Di Corpo, May 07, 2020

In a university-wide email on May 5, the Rev. Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of Fordham University, announced a projected revenue shortfall of nearly $100 million for fiscal year 2020. The revenue loss is, in part, tied to the university’s decision “to refund 50 percent of room, board and select student fees this spring.” (CNS photo/Michael Falco, Fordham University)

Across the United States, where colleges and universities have closed for the academic year and ordered students to return home because of the Covid-19 pandemic, Catholic institutions are facing unique financial and pedagogical challenges.

Sweeping changes to U.S. life have occurred at breakneck speed while states mount individual responses to the coronavirus. Questions abound as to when restrictions on public gatherings may be lifted and how long social distancing must be practiced, obscuring the future of on-campus life for college students. Looking ahead to the next academic year, colleges are still unsure when they can reopen and how they can generate revenue as an economic recession looms.

+++++++++++++

"Nu will be OK. Will have to tighten their belts in a few areas; however, the pandemic represents great opportunities as well...all how we manage it.

https://www.americamagazine.org/politic ... cEtI8ikUrt
User avatar
Eagle
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:02 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby MICKEY » Fri May 08, 2020 4:51 am

Without departing the pages of this forum or its online extensions you can witness some of the impact of the changing college landscape:

Long Island University adds hockey but rebrands itself and combines the athletic program of its urban and suburb campuses as part of a total restructuring of the university.

A potential JC transher listed here attended Wheeling (WV) University, a school up until a year ago and for years was called Wheeling Jesuit University but after dropping all their liberal arts programs including theology and philosophy it was officially abandoned by the Jesuits in 2019. It still however remains a Catholic college and the Jesuits still support the university’s campus ministry

Looking for recruiting information on the Verbal Commits Twitter site one comes across student athletes announcing their availability as two small midwestern private colleges announce their closing just in the past two weeks, Urbana University in Ohio and Holy Family College in Wisconsin. Both had enrollment drop to about 360 students.

I think residential schools with strong reputations will survive. Kids, particularly from suburban and rural areas will always want to “go away to school”, it’s part on the maturing or growing cycle but they will be selective. Parents who can afford it will want to do the best for their children and will support them financially. Colleges in more urban settings who rely on large numbers of day and part time students might find their market looking for more convenient and less costly online alternatives. In the fifties and sixties we saw the suburbanization of America as people left their “old” neighborhoods in the city for green space in the suburbs, business soon followed. In recent years that trend reversed itself as the urban lifestyle was imbraced by younger generations. One has to wonder if recent events will change that and what will be the impact on urban vs suburban universities. Will being safe outweigh being cool, or hip or whatever the right jargon is today. It’s likely many small colleges will disappear or merge into larger ones, just as mom and pop stores were replaced by large national chains. Interesting times ahead, hold on to your hats! (Do they still say that)
MICKEY
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3299
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:54 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby le » Fri May 08, 2020 9:46 am

Interesting times ahead, hold on to your hats! (Do they still say that)


I would expect some "consolidation of schools" after this economic shock to our country. Many small struggling schools before the virus may eventually close due to lack of boarding students.
le
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 15496
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:38 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby Eagle » Fri May 08, 2020 11:14 am

Consolidation of some schools mans and inflow to other schools; thus the need to invest promptly.

It is the time to invest; NU should increase its recruitment efforts throughout the east and do everything to market NU in basketball and hockey, the two teams which have the opportunity to concurrently generate positive revenues and enrollment increases nationally.

Siena doesn't have a bigger budget to lose money, they have a bigger budget to make money and be more attractive to students.

Kids, everyone, wants to be with winners...we are in a position to create our own demand,

We need bold leadership.
User avatar
Eagle
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:02 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby MICKEY » Sat May 09, 2020 2:05 pm

Back in the ‘70s and ‘80s a good number of Catholic women’s colleges either closed their doors, merged into a nearby men’s colleges or went coed. In the NYC area most merged or closed their doors and a small number went coed. However, to my knowledge in western NY all went coed and exist today. The two largest are Daemen (née Rosary Hill) and D’Youville. Daemen has 3000 students of which about 2150 are undergraduates in diverse areas similar to Niagara plus healthcare and 850 are in graduate programs in business, education and healthcare. Their campus is in suburban Amherst near the Youngman Expy and appears to have ample student housing. Their endowment is about $20 million. D’Youville has a similar size enrollment of 3000 but only 1700 undergraduates and a larger graduate enrollment. They state 500 of their students are from Canada. However their curriculum is much more health science oriented then ours including pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc. Their campus is in Buffalo not far from the Thruway’s Niagara Extension and the Peace Bridge. There does not appear they have the same amount of student housing a Daemen. Their endowment is $40 million. Niagara’s endowment as of last July was $93 million. Our enrollment is about 2800 undergrads and 900 graduate students mostly in business and education
So now for my question. Has anyone ever heard if we ever in the past considered merging with one of these schools? With an expanded Golisano Center Is it possible to run the combined undergraduate programs on our campus and run our combined graduate programs in Buffalo orAmherst? Is it time to think about it? What else is there to do on a Saturday afternoon without sports.
MICKEY
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3299
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:54 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby Eagle » Sat May 09, 2020 4:25 pm

Times are tough but new opportunists also will abound. It is time, IMO, to be aggressive and expansive...cut backs in other schools will represent opportunities going forward. If Bonneis and Siena can make money and grow applications through basketball we can as well....plus we have hockey to make thoughtful upgrades turn into an handsome return academically and athletically.


NU opened a new campus in Ontario, Canada

[b"]Niagara University has taken another step toward becoming the premier binational university within the Province of Ontario with the addition of three new programs. Starting now, students can enroll in Niagara’s Master of Business Administration program, while master’s degree programs in information security and digital forensics and in finance are slated to start in the fall."[/b]

https://niagarau.ca/news-and-events/new ... programs-1


Hilbert and St. Bonaventure won’t merge after all
By Jay Tokasz
Published March 20, 2015

An 18-month courtship between Hilbert College and St. Bonaventure University has ended without a marriage proposal.

In separate votes Thursday and Friday, the boards of trustees of both schools decided not to move ahead with a merger of the two institutions.

The two Catholic schools began studying the possibility of a merger in 2013, as a way of confronting the challenging demographics and economics forcing small colleges across the country to re-evaluate how they do business. But their steps toward combining operations had been mostly incremental and exploratory, and the trustee votes ended discussion of a legal merger of the two institutions.

The two sides simply couldn’t agree on an arrangement that worked for both institutions.

“As we came to this month’s decision point, we arrived at different conclusions about the best way to structure an alliance,” said Sister Margaret Carney, president of St. Bonaventure, in a statement.


The schools announced the decision in a joint statement Friday afternoon and scheduled a news conference for Saturday. Neither Carney nor Hilbert President Cynthia A. Zane could be reached on Friday evening to comment further.

Hilbert, a campus of 1,100 students on South Park Avenue in Hamburg, and St. Bonaventure, which has about 2,300 students on its Cattaraugus County campus near Olean, agreed to continue to collaborate on “key strategic initiatives.” The schools share a Franciscan heritage and have had a 20-year partnership in which St. Bonaventure offers weekend graduate-level classes out of its Buffalo Center, on the Hilbert campus. Over the past several months, a working group of faculty members from both institutions developed a joint-degree offering.

The two schools have similar missions and “will continue to examine other collaborative academic program opportunities,” Zane said in the statement. The schools also are working together on marketing and website development, as well as a grant project on general education funded by the Teagle Foundation.

“Both institutions have identified collaboration and integration with other higher-education institutions as key strategic objectives, and we will continue to pursue options with Hilbert,” Carney said.

Last August, the schools used grant funding from the John R. Oishei Foundation to hire a former law school administrator, Teresa O’Rourke, to oversee continuing discussions and planning for a possible merger. And in September, the leaders of St. Bonaventure and Hilbert signed a non-binding memorandum of understanding confirming their intent to explore a merger with the goal of “full and final integration” by July 2016. Under the proposal, a single combined institution, with one board of trustees and one president, would have been formed, operating with two campuses under the name St. Bonaventure University.

Hilbert’s trustees met Thursday, while the board of St. Bonaventure met Friday and will meet again Saturday.

If both boards had voted to proceed with a merger, the trustees then would have had to negotiate the details and legal terms of such an arrangement.

But any collaboration going forward won’t involve any changes to how either institution is governed and won’t require legal approvals.

email: jtokasz@buffnews.com
User avatar
Eagle
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:02 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby MICKEY » Sat May 09, 2020 7:06 pm

One can count on one hand the number of Catholic colleges that have parlayed athletic success into becoming a nationally recognized university: Notre Dame, Boston College, Villanova and the relatively upstarts Gonzaga, and Xavier. Siena and St Bonaventure don’t come close to making the cut. Gonzaga and Xavier were beneficiary of a combination of luck, location, and sucessful alumni and friends. it would take both my hands and the removal of my socks to count the number of fan forums that proclaim their school can become the “Gonzaga of the East”. Sure would it be nice if Niagara could win the big one and get some national publicity which might impact enrollment for a year or two but to keep it going and have long term impact will require a lot more than that.

Certainly, there will be opportunities to be captured because of the misfortune of others. The strong will likely get stronger and so will the wiser. The concept of merging with another school may make no sense at all. I don’t know, I don’t have anywhere near the knowledge that would be needed to reach a conclusion on the subject. It’s obviously worked in some cases and makes no sense in others. Like I said I’m just looking for sometime to do on another quiet Saturday and looking for someone who might have insight and history on the subject.
MICKEY
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3299
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:54 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby le » Sun May 10, 2020 1:06 pm

Mick: Just quickly off the top of my head. Newton College merged with BC back in the 70's, and Wheelock just recently merged with BU.

In 1974, Newton College of the Sacred Heart was merged into BC, allowing expansion of Boston College to the Newton College 40-acre (160,000 m2) campus.

Wheelock and Boston University announced in August that the two schools would be merging.May 18, 2018.
le
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 15496
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:38 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby Eagle » Tue May 12, 2020 9:41 am

$70k for Zoom classes? Virus crisis leaves US students miffed
by Camille Camdessus

The campus of George Washington University is nearly empty as in-person classes have been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic—but students say they are being shortchanged, with distance learning not a comparable substitute
The cost of a university education in the United States has long been eye-watering, with a year costing tens of thousands of dollars.


But as the coronavirus crisis settles in, students—many of whom take out huge loans to finance their degrees—are wondering how to justify spending $70,000 a year on.... Zoom classes.

They feel like they're getting the raw end of the deal, and are demanding that their colleges be held to account.

"We're paying for other services that the campus offers that aren't digitized," says Dhrumil Shah, who is doing a Master's degree in public health at George Washington University...."


https://phys.org/news/2020-05-70k-class ... 1CtWgbtt9A
User avatar
Eagle
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:02 pm

Re: Challenge for Catholic Colleges and Universities

Postby Eagle » Tue May 12, 2020 3:43 pm

.

Could this spell an opportunity for smaller schools?
If the ?bigs" are closing down some kids, I assume, will opt for he traditional college experience...


CSU plans to cancel most in-person classes and go online this fall, chancellor announces
Cal State Long Beach
Cal State Long Beach is among the 23 CSU campuses that will go mainly online with fall classes. (Los Angeles Times)
By NINA AGRAWALSTAFF WRITER
MAY 12, 2020

The 23-campus California State University system plans to all but cancel in-person classes in the fall and instead will offer instruction primarily online, Chancellor Timothy White announced Tuesday.

The vast majority of classes across the Cal State system will be taught online, White said, with some limited exceptions that allow for in-person activity. The decision comes as schools throughout the country grapple with how long to keep campuses closed amid the coronavirus crisis.

“Our university when open without restrictions and fully in person… is a place where over 500,000 people come together in close and vibrant proximity,” White said at a meeting of Cal State’s Board of Trustees. “That approach sadly just isn’t in the cards now.”............

https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... id=1746013

.
User avatar
Eagle
Purple Eagle
 
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:02 pm


Return to NIAGARA SPORTS

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 15 guests

cron